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Learn Hawaiian

Pūnana Leo Preschools

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“Pūnana Leo is a fun and loving place to grow as an ʻohana. The foundation of Hawaiian language, culture and Hawaiian values have made my children secure in their identity, respectful, and caring about their community. Pūnana Leo prepared them academically as well, they can read and write and are very prepared for kindergarten. I would recommend Pūnana Leo to anyone.” Punana Leo o Hilo Parent

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Niuolahiki Online Hawaiian Language Courses

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Niuolahiki is named for a legendary coconut tree who transports his grandchild from Hawai‘i to a distant land far across the ocean. Likewise, the Niuolahiki Distance Learning Program extends its culturally-rooted Hawaiian language program throughout the world. Coursework for the program is based on the newly revised version of the textbook, Nā Kai ‘Ewalu, written by Dr. Kauanoe Kamanā and Dr. William H. “Pila” Wilson available exclusively for a limited time to our self-directed online learners.

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Hiʻipēpē - Infant Program

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Hi‘ipēpē is an infant and toddler program that aims to support families who are committed to making Hawaiian the primary language of their home. Hiʻipēpē provides care through the medium of Hawaiian for infants and toddlers between the ages of 9 months to 3 years. Open enrollment for Hiʻipēpē is year round pending space availability. At this time, this program is offered at Pūnana Leo o Hilo and Pūnana Leo o Waiʻanae. For more information, contact Pualani Kahoʻohanohano at (808) 935-4304.

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Hale Kipa ʻŌiwi

image The ‘Aha Pūnana Leo is the nationally recognized model for Native American language revitalization programs in the United States. After working to remove the ban on the use of Hawaiian in Hawai‘i’s school system, ‘Aha Pūnana Leo joined with Native Americans to convince the U.S. Congress to restore Native American languages to Native American communities.  Since the passage of the Native American Languages Act in 1990, efforts have increased throughout the United States to save the some 200 remaining Native American languages from extinction. 

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